• INDIGENOUS

    &

    MINORITY

    HISTORICAL TRAUMA

  • CONTEXT

     

    HISTORICAL TRAUMA IN NATIVE LANDS

    From the lasting legacies of Canada’s reservation schools and the Sixties Scoop era to present day corporate intrusions on native lands across the Americas, South Asia, and Australia, the continued fight for justice unfolds to this day. Indigenous people have faced systemic efforts to erase their language, resources, and culture for generations. In a system that has removed and isolated tribes on reservations, paved a substance abuse crisis, and suppressed cultural practices, policy and politics overlooks the longstanding impact of historical trauma on today's Indigenous mental health epidemic. Accountability for past atrocities and responsibility for continued abuses remain with governments, including making the necessary resources and reparations available to create pathways for reconciliation and healing. For many, colonial footprints still entrap native lives today.

     

    SLAVERY IN AMERICA

    With the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in December 1865, slavery was officially abolished. However, in the Thirteenth Amendment's “punishment for crime”, slavery moved from plantations to prisons after mass incarceration for minor offences - heralding in the new Jim Crow era of evolved racism and servitude. Connecting present-day struggles of African Americans confronted by segregated schools, disproportionate criminalisation, police brutality, and voter suppression to the ongoing legacy of slavery and inequity can open a door to a national narrative on trauma, servitude and injustice.

     

    OUR APPROACH

     

    Our Historical Trauma research delves into the transgenerational impacts of cultural genocide and human rights abuses in a system borne out of identity disenfranchisement. We look at mental health approaches working with traditional Indigenous practices on collective trauma and the particular battles facing African Americans affected by an uptick in racism, hate crimes, and a shift to exclusionary politics and populist rhetoric.

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